Types Of Wasps, Bees And Other Stinging Insects

Wasps

Wasps

During the summer and fall months, stinging insects can become a problem for homeowners in Missouri and other parts of the mid-west. These insects include honey bees, bumble bees, paper wasps, bald-faced hornets and yellow jackets. These insects feed on the nectar of flowers, as well as on other insects, so they will nest in areas where they have easy access to their food sources and in areas where they feel protected. To the annoyance of many homeowners, this can mean in the eaves of their home, in attics, under decking, in bushes surrounding homes or even inside the walls of their home. If you have stinging insects swarming near your home or property, it’s important to know the health risks associated with having these insects around, as well as what you can do to avoid coming in contact with the stinging end of these insects.

Bee

Bee

Honey bees and bumble bees are beneficial insects because they help pollinate flowers and plants by inadvertently carrying pollen from flower to flower as they feed on the flower’s nectar. Both bees are relatively unaggressive unless they feel their nest is in danger, and then they will sting. They build temporary nests on tree branches, but their more permanent nests care called beehives, and are built in the hollows of trees, in hollow walls, in vacant attics or similar places that offer shelter from the weather.
Bee Photo Image

Bee

Yellow jackets, paper wasps and bald-faced hornets feed on insects, as well as on nectar and sometimes on food meant for people. They can be quite aggressive, although mostly so when they feel their nest has been threatened. Paper wasps tend to hang their comb nests from twigs and branches of trees and shrubs, while yellow jackets are mostly ground nesters. Bald-faced hornets typically nest in trees, but can also nest in overhangs, utility poles, sheds and barns or even in houses- as long as the location is sheltered, they will nest there.

Being able to differentiate between these different stinging insects is valuable in understanding what type of bug you have swarming around your property. These insects all have a similar look and size, but there are distinctive features for each:

  • Honey Bees – approximately 1/2 inch to 5/8 an inch long and banded with orange and brown or black and are mostly covered with pale hairs, especially on the thorax. A barbed stinger is present which is lost in the victim when stung.
  • Bumble Bees – measuring from 1/2 to 1 inch long, these are more robust than honey bees, having an overall fuzzy appearance on the top surface of their abdomen. They have broad bands of black and yellow, rarely orange patterns. Bumble bees also have a barbed stinger, but don’t lose their stinger when they sting.
  • Paper Wasps – measuring from 3/4 to 1 inch long, and depending on the particular species are colored in combinations of black, yellow, orange and brown with grayish colored wings. They look long-legged and have a lance-like stinger that allows them to sting repeatedly.
  • Yellow Jackets – measuring approximately 3/8 to 3/4 inch long, with abdomens banded with yellow and black and some species with white and black. Shorter legged than paper wasps with wider abdomens, but share a similar stinger.
  • Bald-faced Hornets – these are actually a type of wasp, rather than a true hornet and they measure 5/8 to 7/8 inch in length and are colored black with a white pattern on the face, white stripes on the thorax and white bands on the end of the abdomen. Their sting is similar to that of paper wasps and yellow jackets.

If you find a stinging insect nest on your property, you need to be aware that these insects will sting you if they feel their nest is threatened. To protect yourself from these insects, you can wear light colored clothing, avoid the use of the flowery and scented cosmetics and perfumes, and make sure to wear clothing that covers your entire body while working outdoors. If you are picnicking outdoors, keep food under wraps until you are ready to eat, and make sure to put it away immediately after eating, as food can attract bees and other stinging insects. If you feel you are being pursued by a stinging insect, avoid sudden movements and loud sounds, as these can startle bees, wasps and yellow jackets and cause them to sting. The very best way to prevent stinging insects from stinging is to have their nests professionally removed and your home treated with a barrier treatment that will keep the insects from coming back. Trying to remove their nests on your own can have terrible consequences, as these insects will aggressively attack if they feel under attack. Their sting can cause swelling in the local area where the sting has occurred, and if multiple stings are sustained, they can cause severe swelling, pain, redness and even illness. To protect your family and your home from these stinging insects, contact a professional pest control company for effective and safe bee, yellow jacket, bald-faced hornet and wasp control.

If you have a stinging insect problem on your property, contacting a pest control company who offers exceptional pest control in your area is the best way to keep your home and property pest free. For stinging insect control and extermination in Missouri, you can visit http://www.rottler.com for more information.

Read the Original Article Here:
Stinging Insects 101 – Identification and Habits of Wasps, Bees and Other Stinging Insects